How does the Binder Jetting 3D printing process work?

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  • Published on Mar 11, 2018
  • What is the 3D printing technology Binder Jetting?

    The binder jetting process is a 3D printing process in which powder material applied in thin layers is selectively bonded with a "binder". The coater applies hair-thin layers of powder material to the construction platform, which are then selectively glued by the print head. These steps are repeated until the product is built. In practice, several products are usually produced in a single job box in order to make the best possible use of it. After the printing process, the printed components are freed of any unglued material and prepared for further processing.

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  • Science & TechnologyScience & Technology

Comments • 10

  • John Theux
    John Theux 3 years ago

    I really think that you can combine HSS and laser sintering process to make metal hss process.
    with a 4-20 kw co2 laser used in most metal cutting machines, you will be 10-50 times faster than others metal sintering process but to keep a good resolution, a IR absorbent fluid will be applied on the powder.

    • John Theux
      John Theux 3 years ago

      +Michael Shaffer Hmm, metal has a very high conductivity and a very low heat capacity so the heat of the molten metal will dissipate himself very very fast so if you melt it slowly yes, it will make a pool of molten metal but with lasers you can heat the voxels so fast that the heat will not have the time to melt the surrounding powder.

    • Michael Shaffer
      Michael Shaffer 3 years ago

      John theux interesting. I like the idea. I still wonder though, you’re actual melt pool from the laser would still be larger than each voxel, effectively melting metal powder surrounding the inkjetted area.

    • John Theux
      John Theux 3 years ago

      I think if you used a more powerful laser you have to make it move faster so the energy absorbed by each voxel wouldn't change but the number of voxels sintered per second would increase. But the mirrors that move the laser aren't fast enough to do that. So you have to used many lasers and it will cost a lot or you have tou used a larger focus point but you will loose resolution. The purpose of the ink is to keep a good resolution by making voxels that is smaller than the focus point.

    • Michael Shaffer
      Michael Shaffer 3 years ago

      John theux What would be the advantage though of laying the binder down first if you are going to use lasers anyway to sinter the part? I like the concept just trying to understand and how it is faster. Would the lasers be able to move faster because of the higher energy input?

    • Michael Shaffer
      Michael Shaffer 3 years ago

      John theux What would be the advantage though of laying the binder down first if you are going to use lasers anyway to sinter the part?

  • JamsJars
    JamsJars 3 years ago +12

    kurzgesagt - in a nutshell.... Is that you? Never thought I would hear this voice on 3D Printing tech showcase video.

  • John Theux
    John Theux 3 years ago

    What's new about hss?