🥛Freeze Dried Milk🥛 Can Dairy Last 25 Years?

Share
Embed
  • Published on Mar 8, 2019
  • Imagine being able to preserve milk and dairy for 25+ years. It takes up very little room to store. An entire gallon fits in a quart ball jar. It is a simple 1 to 1 ratio for reconstituting. But does it taste like it does when it goes into the freeze dryer?
    For PRICING & information on the HARVESTRIGHT, visit:
    affiliates.harvestright.com/416.html
    For More LIVE. LIFE. SIMPLE. Videos Subscribe to Retired at 40
    thexvid.com/user/Retiredat40
    Here is a link to the products i use and love!
    www.amazon.com/shop/retiredat40
    Retired at 40 on Pinterest:
    www.pinterest.com/retired_at_40/
    Join me on Facebook:
    Retired-at-40-1759904760696918/
    I'm on Instagram: (barely) 😂
    retiredat40livelifesimple
  • Film & AnimationFilm & Animation

Comments • 141

  • Almamater8888
    Almamater8888 13 days ago +1

    Has anyone tried their homemade freeze dried food that is at least a few years old? I’ve been reading about the high failure rate of mylar bags and I am concerned about the long-term viability of freeze dried food.

    • Retired at 40- Live.Life.Simple.
      Retired at 40- Live.Life.Simple.  13 days ago

      Ball jars work just as well in my opinion and you can see what's going on inside. I just had some ground pork from when i first purchased my machine.

  • natalie howell
    natalie howell Month ago

    Big Question:
    I do fd RAW MILK then reconstitute it will it still separate out with the cream on top?
    If so then I’m going to do it and be able to have fresh butter 20 years from now.

  • Felisha Kay
    Felisha Kay Month ago

    Freeze dry antifreeze

  • Marie Christine Dela Cruz

    Sir if i extract gelatin and i need to put in freezer dryer to convert a powder they possible?

  • Wompol
    Wompol 4 months ago +1

    1.5 gal/4=0.375gal 1gal=8.6 lbs 8.6(0.375)=3.225 lbs per tray wet

  • Justine
    Justine 4 months ago

    Yeah, I use a fan on my vacuum pump at work. Totally worth it.

  • Michael Weber
    Michael Weber 4 months ago

    What are you using to put the trays on in your deep freeze?

  • Tami Shepard
    Tami Shepard 4 months ago

    I have dairy goats. Have had no milk (fluid) since 2002 but raw goat milk. Milk flow is seasonal. Have been wanting to get a freeze dryer to do the milk. One source recommended 1 qt./tray. To me, that sounds like a starting point. Also remember........ if the milk is not standardized through the fornication (deadly pausterization, horrid homezination) then milk can weigh different!

  • Tony Pizza
    Tony Pizza 5 months ago

    I have been doing milk 4% for about a year. The last two batches have exploded (see pic) . Any ideas? www.dropbox.com/s/20bie4u3vlhgex4/IMG_6466.JPG?dl=0

  • Gabe Sennheiser
    Gabe Sennheiser 6 months ago

    next time you freeze dry some milk weigh it before and after, and keep note of the water weight loss, that will help you determine the exact water to powder mix you need. say it weighs 1 pound before drying , and .5 pounds after, that would mean your mix should be 1 part powder to 1 part water, because you lost half the weight to water sublimation during making it a powder(drying). that will give you a good idea on how much water to powder should be mixed. And remember measuring by weight is more accurate than volume especially when using the metric system to measure the weight.

    • Maui Randall
      Maui Randall 7 days ago

      How would measuring by volume before and after even work in a freeze dryer? the volume stays about the same

    • Retired at 40- Live.Life.Simple.
      Retired at 40- Live.Life.Simple.  6 months ago

      Thanks Gabe. I usually weigh things about 50% of the time and the other 50% i forget to. Eventually if i do it enough it will just be part of the routine.

  • henry rosa
    henry rosa 6 months ago

    Great video, I just subscribe to your channel. I have an answer to your measurement question for freeze dried milk.
    3 tbsp. powder + 1 c. water = 1 c. milk
    3/4 c. powder + 4 c. water = 1 qt milk
    3 c. powder + 16 c. water = 1 gal. milk

  • Holocene
    Holocene 7 months ago

    Yo!! So I’ve done milk a few times. However I did skim milk once and the middle of the trays frothed and bubbles up in the middle to where they pushed up against the tops of the trays above them. Has anyone else seen this with skim??

  • somstt
    somstt 7 months ago

    Hello

    How much time of primary and secondary drying saperately ? Is the freezer running during secondary drying too ?

    • somstt
      somstt 7 months ago

      @Retired at 40- Live.Life.Simple. sir can you send your email to saikiran0088@gmail.com, i have little query about freeze drying process as I am always getting wet item

    • Retired at 40- Live.Life.Simple.
      Retired at 40- Live.Life.Simple.  7 months ago

      1st cycle is usually around 2 hours if the food is prefrozen. 2nd is determined by remaining moisture and chamber pressure. 3rd is preset to default 7 or custom.

  • Joe Biden's Chain
    Joe Biden's Chain 7 months ago

    weigh 1.5 gal of milk and subtract your product to know how much water to use

  • Hans Gruetzenbach
    Hans Gruetzenbach 7 months ago

    Great video, but tell me about your label maker that you used to label your milk.

  • QuebecoisSti
    QuebecoisSti 7 months ago

    why not buy powder milk right away ??

    • WH6FQE - RC Anderson
      WH6FQE - RC Anderson 6 days ago

      @Maui Randall Thats what all my plants and trees are, natural "oxygen generators", lol

    • Maui Randall
      Maui Randall 7 days ago

      @WH6FQE - RC Anderson yep by think everyday how good an investment my oxygen generator was because if all of the air in the atmosphere disappeared as we knew it we all be f***** without this very necessary piece of prepping equipment.

    • WH6FQE - RC Anderson
      WH6FQE - RC Anderson 5 months ago

      @QuebecoisSti No, not at all. If a SHTF event were to happen today, and life as you know it was no longer a possibility, I would still have enough milk to last my family a minimum of 10 years at the rate we normally consume milk for drinking and in recipes. And that is all without having to worry about finding any or milking a single cow. And I know that 10 years from now, that milk will still be just as good as it was the day it was produced.

    • QuebecoisSti
      QuebecoisSti 5 months ago

      @WH6FQE - RC Anderson damnnnn that's overkill hehe

    • WH6FQE - RC Anderson
      WH6FQE - RC Anderson 5 months ago

      Powdered milk is dehydrated, not freeze-dried, so the shelf-life is not nearly as long. Typically simple dehydrated foods are only shelf-stable for about 4 to 5 years where freeze dried are shelf-stable for 20+ years.

  • Keith Brookshire
    Keith Brookshire 7 months ago +1

    You're putting me closer and closer to purchasing the freeze dryer. My biggest issue is the space it takes.

  • Angela S.
    Angela S. 8 months ago

    Great video. I freeze my half gallon cartons and place a label on it. when we thaw it overnight, I'll right a date 14 days away for use and cool. But freeze dry will be similar to powdered milk that we used a lot of in the 70's...how lovely is that!! This would be great for a baker. I think the step you took freezing first can be avoided. Your freezing time probably would reduce tremendously if you just take the pans and take your time to pour cup by cup to fill your trays while sitting in your dryer. However, a gallon is 4 quarts so how will one quart re-constitute back to 1 gallon at 1to 1 ratio (with one quart)? Anyway, I have plans to purchase one of these by Christmas. I'm a veteran and MRE's are similar but i love the freeze drying concept instead. Also, how much of an increase in your power bill have you noticed. Blessings.

    • WH6FQE - RC Anderson
      WH6FQE - RC Anderson 5 months ago

      Angela S. You're not rehydrating it one to one the way you are thinking, not one-quart powder to one-quart water. When rehydrating liquids it goes by weight not volume. So, if you have powder from one quart of milk, say it weighs half of a pound now that it is freeze-dried, and before freeze-drying it, you knew the weight of a quart of milk was say one pound for example, then the freeze-drying would have reduced the weight by half of a pound, so one half pound of water is what you need to put back into it to reconstitute it, not half of a quart of water.

    • Retired at 40- Live.Life.Simple.
      Retired at 40- Live.Life.Simple.  8 months ago

      If you pre-freeze before you Freeze dry, it skips most of the first cycle cutting off 6 or more hours.
      here is my video on electricity costs:
      thexvid.com/video/f1pgcIhchuw/video.html

  • Judy H
    Judy H 8 months ago

    Have you tried to freeze dry half and half or cream?

    • Retired at 40- Live.Life.Simple.
      Retired at 40- Live.Life.Simple.  8 months ago

      I have not personally, but have heard mixed results. The only issue i would see is the high fat content. It may be an issue when rehydrating.

  • Angelina Cole
    Angelina Cole 8 months ago

    After freeze drying will this taste the same as dried milk you buy in the store? I usually use dried milk to cook with. The problem is it tastes nasty and doesn’t mix well when I put with tomato soup.

  • Valley Bear
    Valley Bear 8 months ago +2

    Awesome video! I have been really curious how milk would turn out and have been looking forward to this one for a while. I was surprised how it stayed. I thought it would shrink down on the tray leaving a thinner layer when it was finished

    • Valley Bear
      Valley Bear 8 months ago

      Retired at 40- Live.Life.Simple. Ok great to know!

    • Retired at 40- Live.Life.Simple.
      Retired at 40- Live.Life.Simple.  8 months ago

      I'm not sure of the price of commercially freeze dried milk, but in the meidum size i can fit about 1.5 gallons and you r electricity costs are going to be about $2-3

    • Valley Bear
      Valley Bear 8 months ago

      Yeah it looks great. I need milk for my food storage and do you know if it would be worth it price wise to freeze dry my own or is milk? It’s something I need to look in to

    • Retired at 40- Live.Life.Simple.
      Retired at 40- Live.Life.Simple.  8 months ago +1

      I did too. The milk does very well

  • Zealot Patriot
    Zealot Patriot 8 months ago +1

    I think the fat in the milk will go rancid

    • WH6FQE - RC Anderson
      WH6FQE - RC Anderson 5 months ago

      @Zealot Patriot As long as it is freeze dried and then stored with an oxygen absorber to prevent oxygen from getting to it and it is stored in a cool, dry, dark location and is protected from pests or rodents, it will store for at least 20 years. I had a friend freeze-dry 50 pounds of bacon strips for me in a commercial freeze-dryer where he works about 15 years ago. I just cooked some of it up for breakfast this morning and it was perfect. Now even after the apocalypse I can still have my honey and brown sugar crispy bacon for breakfast, lol. Unfortunately I only have about 5 pounds of it left so I am going to have to get to making some more soon before I let myself run out. As for avocados, I have never tried them myself as I do not eat them. I even have to beg a neighbor to come take the avocados off of my tree before they make a mess in my yard. There shouldn't be a problem with freeze-drying those though, and they would have the same shelf-life of any other fruits and vegetables, about 25 years.

    • Zealot Patriot
      Zealot Patriot 5 months ago +1

      @WH6FQE - RC Anderson Thanks for the response, but what if the food that was freeze dried was solid and not a powder; for instance nuts, avocados or fatty meat?

    • WH6FQE - RC Anderson
      WH6FQE - RC Anderson 5 months ago +1

      @Zealot Patriot There are stories and videos going around about powdered milk going rancid over time for preppers, but there were a couple differences. First off, those were dehydrated and not freeze dried. Dehydrating foods only gives a shelf-life of about 4 to 5 years, not the 20+ year shelf-life of freeze-dried foods. Also, for every instance that I saw of powdered milk going rancid, it was stored in FoodSaver type vacuum sealed bags. Vacuum sealing food in bags does not remove all of the oxygen from the bags, there is still a tiny amount in the crevices of the food. Also, those bags are permeable, so slowly over time they will allow are to re-enter into the bags. What they are forgetting to do is to put an oxygen absorber inside the bags, just like you would with a mylar bag to take care of any oxygen that is still trapped inside or finds its way into the bag over time. I store the freeze-dried milk powder that I buy in mylar bags with an oxygen absorber and a desiccant pack and have never had a bit of trouble with it going rancid. It is impossible for it to go rancid as long as all oxygen and all moisture are removed from it, as it requires moisture and oxygen for it to go rancid.

    • Zealot Patriot
      Zealot Patriot 8 months ago +1

      @Retired at 40- Live.Life.Simple. I heard differently.

    • Retired at 40- Live.Life.Simple.
      Retired at 40- Live.Life.Simple.  8 months ago +2

      Thanks for your comment. I don't think it will go rancid if there is no air and no water. Bacterias or mold or anything similar need those things to start and survive. You can also eliminate light.

  • donbo2001
    donbo2001 8 months ago

    Great video, thanks, I didn't think to pre-freeze liquids in the trays, that is a good tip. I have freeze dried some milk and then run it through a blender to make a finer powder but I only get about a 2.5 quarts in a one quart mason jar, not a gallon. I have only tried whole milk so far but noticed that if I just mix it with a spoon when I rehydrate it, I get some chunks (I think it might be the fat sticking together in little globules), if I use a shaker jar (like for protein shakes) it mixes smooth. The whole milk was less chunky (or smaller chunks?) when I powdered it with a blender though versus my first batch that I just crushed/crumbled the freeze dried milk by hand. I was thinking 2% might mix okay with a spoon since there is less fat but haven't tried that yet. Thanks!

    • Retired at 40- Live.Life.Simple.
      Retired at 40- Live.Life.Simple.  8 months ago

      I suppose if the globs are fat that when you reconstitute you wouldn't get the same results in every go round. One would have more fat content than another.

    • donbo2001
      donbo2001 8 months ago

      @Retired at 40- Live.Life.Simple. I tried buttermilk which worked fine but when I ran it through the blender it didn't get to the fine powder that I got with whole milk (slight clumping), so I figure that might be the limit of what I can run through the blender. Unpasteurized might be similar since the fat is in bigger globs (microscopically speaking)?

    • Retired at 40- Live.Life.Simple.
      Retired at 40- Live.Life.Simple.  8 months ago

      I didn't get any chunks in mine, but i used the coffee frother which is kind of like a little mixer. I suppose different milk would make a difference as well. I wonder what unpasteurized would do?

  • Kimo Alopeke
    Kimo Alopeke 8 months ago

    Oh my gosh, DakotaRose56 is spot on. Maybe you can try freeze-drying coffee. Oh sweet! Keep up the good work. Thank you.

  • Emily H
    Emily H 8 months ago +1

    Glad you got to try the milk. I am doing coffee in my machine this week I am traveling internationally in a few months and I want to take my own coffee with me so I am Brewing Peet's Coffee and I'm putting it in the freeze dryer. I will let you know how it turns out. I'm sure it will be the same consistency as milk and just add hot water. I'm taking my own milk with me to just to be safe at least a bag or two

    • Some Guy
      Some Guy Month ago

      How did the coffee go Emily?

    • HealthyEnergetics
      HealthyEnergetics Month ago

      or the machine thinks it’s just flavored water and nothing will remain.....??

    • Emily H
      Emily H 8 months ago

      @Retired at 40- Live.Life.Simple. oh nice. Will look forward to your video

    • Retired at 40- Live.Life.Simple.
      Retired at 40- Live.Life.Simple.  8 months ago +1

      Very cool. I am making a coffee video right now. I have had quite a few people that want to try it. Safe travels.

  • Timanator
    Timanator 8 months ago +5

    So this is what retired people do! Lol great video man!

  • Connie Lytle
    Connie Lytle 8 months ago

    Why do you have a bottle on your oil pump?

    • Connie Lytle
      Connie Lytle 8 months ago

      @Retired at 40- Live.Life.Simple. thank you! I will!

    • Retired at 40- Live.Life.Simple.
      Retired at 40- Live.Life.Simple.  8 months ago

      @Connie Lytle That's great! If you ever have questions, feel free to reach out.

    • Connie Lytle
      Connie Lytle 8 months ago

      @Retired at 40- Live.Life.Simple. we are getting the large freeze dryer and I love watching your videos. They are awesome and very helpful! I just found you a few days ago.

    • Retired at 40- Live.Life.Simple.
      Retired at 40- Live.Life.Simple.  8 months ago

      There is an oil mister on some vacuum pumps. If they build up too much pressure, it has to go somewhere. It sprays out the mister with some oil usually. It makes a mess so the bottle catches it.

  • Shona Rae
    Shona Rae 8 months ago

    Would you be offended if I said the outtakes were my favorite part? Heehee! Loving that Laid-Back hoody.

  • wjf213
    wjf213 8 months ago +2

    Adding a dash of vanilla flavoring to the milk will usually make it taste much better to kids, at least that's what we've found. Keep up the great work.

  • Old Frugal One Hyper-Drive Movement

    Almost forgot to add one of my latest Boo Boo's that others may learn from. I did some tomato sauce and spaghetti sauce to powder and store. I made the mistake of filling the tray very full and it took almost 45 hours and still in some spots it was a little gooey. I packed what was dry and tossed what was not dry. My lesson for myself is to not overload the trays. When I kept it to 1/4 to 3/8 inch thick it dried well and in less time. Hope no one makes the mistake I did. Happy prepping - Peace be with you.

  • Old Frugal One Hyper-Drive Movement

    Yes I've done a lot of whole milk. I place my trays in the dryer first and pull the tray out just a few inches then measure the milk into the tray with a large measuring cup. I don't spill any that way. Each tray will hold one quart without overflowing at the back. After drying I run it through my food processer to powder it. I put one tray into small Mylar bags. I feel this makes it easy to figure the amount of water to add back.
    I've never pre-frozen my milk and it turns out fine. Nice and white and very dry. I cant tell the difference from fresh and freeze dried milk. I do plan to do some chocolate milk for the grand kids. (I like it too) If you chill your water in the fridge first you'll have cold milk to serve right away. I use water from my Alexapure filter and it makes great tasting milk. So much better than the boxed powered non-fat store bought stuff. I've hated that crap since I was a kid and my grandma served it. That's all they drank. Never fresh.
    Yes, if you own a dryer, by all means do some milk. You'll be happy with it. Happy prepping - peace be with you.

    • Old Frugal One Hyper-Drive Movement
      Old Frugal One Hyper-Drive Movement 8 months ago

      @Retired at 40- Live.Life.Simple. Yep. It works well. Eggs, milk, gravy, tomato sauce, mashed potato's, are a few I've done. I like the KitchenAid from Walmart. It has a convenient spout to pour stuff into the bag.
      But I suppose they all work as well to do the job. Good luck to you.

    • Retired at 40- Live.Life.Simple.
      Retired at 40- Live.Life.Simple.  8 months ago

      Great tip on the food processor, that could be done with lots different freeze dried things.

  • Rgb Color
    Rgb Color 8 months ago

    If you found a way to lower your trays inside your deep freezer, I think you'd find that not only would they freeze much quicker, but they'd be more solid and colder as well. Heat rises and cold sinks so being up near the lid, the trays don't cool off nearly as quickly. You could also fix this by putting a small computer fan inside the freezer to circulate the air to prevent the thermal stratification. You could probably cut your freezing time in half.

    • Retired at 40- Live.Life.Simple.
      Retired at 40- Live.Life.Simple.  8 months ago +1

      As long as it freezes overnight and gets solid, i am not too concerned about the freeze time. If i keep freeze drying for a couple more months 24/7 (like i have been), there won't be anything left in the deep freeze😉

  • Amanda Yarborough
    Amanda Yarborough 8 months ago

    I have done a lot of milk. So easy and love having it on hand. I am so glad I do not have to buy that awful tasting stuff from the store any more :) Nice video.

  • Dorothy Conn
    Dorothy Conn 8 months ago +14

    You should have tried chocolate milk

    • Dana Kelly
      Dana Kelly 2 months ago +1

      Dorothy Conn it does just like white milk.

  • Ole Gunderson
    Ole Gunderson 8 months ago

    What was your amount of FD milk to make 8oz of liquid?

  • Shane Clements
    Shane Clements 8 months ago +1

    Dried full cream milk powder. 125 grams per litre of water.
    Milk powder that is spray dried retains all nutrients. This is the most common commercial process. You see the tall drying towers at dairy plants.
    My idea would be to freeze dry the milk powder to zero out any remaining moisture content and then store in mylar.
    Love the channel.

    • Old Frugal One Hyper-Drive Movement
      Old Frugal One Hyper-Drive Movement 8 months ago

      @Emily H I agree. Good luck to you. Peace be with you.

    • Emily H
      Emily H 8 months ago +2

      @Old Frugal One Hyper-Drive Movement no I would not freeze dried powdered milk I freeze dried fresh milk I don't like the ingredients in powdered milk from the store.

    • Old Frugal One Hyper-Drive Movement
      Old Frugal One Hyper-Drive Movement 8 months ago +1

      @Emily H Same here - I freeze dry whole (liquid) milk and powder it and put in Mylar. It should be good for 20 years. What are your thoughts?
      Shane Clements is talking about freeze drying commercial milk powder. I just don't see the need for that. Seems like a waist of energy.
      Have you tried doing chocolate milk? I want to try that and see how it goes. If it passes the grand kid test I'll know it works.

    • Emily H
      Emily H 8 months ago

      I store my milk in mylar bags with oxygen absorbers I'm doing it for prepping not for immediate use

    • Old Frugal One Hyper-Drive Movement
      Old Frugal One Hyper-Drive Movement 8 months ago

      Just my thoughts - freeze drying powdered milk seems like a waste of energy. To remove any excess moisture just add a moisture absorber to your Mylar bag with your O2 absorber. I don't see the need to freeze dry powered milk.

  • Holocene
    Holocene 8 months ago +2

    I love how we say it out west. Sounds like my mom. “Melk”

  • aussietrevor
    aussietrevor 8 months ago

    Do you think this is good idea? Weigh water discharged from air
    valve on completion collect in suitable size bucket include ice in freezer
    compartment do not defrost this should indicate all water taken out I think this would work best when all trays have a similar water content
    Tried to set FD unit to adjust air pressure from your video this it seems to have disappeared I have the later version FD from HR Menu appearing to be different than yours making your procedure different I would be grateful if u you can show me how to set air pressure below the default 2,500 millitors I
    have ran 6 cycles with unsatisfactory results as the air pressure does not drop
    below default The food is not dried as sublimation has not taken place I have hopefully
    checked for leaks The unit does pull a vacuum not to the required levels What am I doing wrong My solution may be helpful to others As yet only completed one successful batch

  • Tom Clarkson
    Tom Clarkson 8 months ago

    The way you mixed that milk was awesome. Great idea.

  • Teresa Parker
    Teresa Parker 8 months ago +1

    I don't have the new software. So if I prefreeze my food/liquid in a freezer, how long should I freeze the products in the freeze dryer?

    • Retired at 40- Live.Life.Simple.
      Retired at 40- Live.Life.Simple.  8 months ago

      I have found the average cycle is $2-3 if you pre freeze. My cost here in Colorado is 9cents per Kwh. I do a cost breakdown in alot of my videos. I have one that covers just electricity. It was made before i had the new software, so prices are a bit higher than now.
      thexvid.com/video/f1pgcIhchuw/video.html

    • Retired at 40- Live.Life.Simple.
      Retired at 40- Live.Life.Simple.  8 months ago

      On the older pumps, there is an oil mister and the cover is just to collect oil that sprays. I am not certain the new oiled pumps have one. If so, just cut a hole into a container and slide it over. It saves you from a mess every once in a while.

    • Kathy Burson
      Kathy Burson 8 months ago

      Retired at 40- Live.Life.Simple. Also, since you run the FD every day, do you have an estimate of daily electricity cost?

    • Kathy Burson
      Kathy Burson 8 months ago

      Retired at 40- Live.Life.Simple. thank you for your reply. I noticed the plastic container over a portion of your pump mechanism. Is this to help keep it free of dust? I have not unboxed mine yet, waiting on electrician to set plug so hopefully this weekend.

    • Retired at 40- Live.Life.Simple.
      Retired at 40- Live.Life.Simple.  8 months ago +1

      If your machine is new, most likely it is installed. I pre-freeze everything. You will know if you have the new software because it will ask if your food is pre frozen. Go to my facebook page and i can send you a sheet if you message me with your email.

  • Sportsmobile 83
    Sportsmobile 83 8 months ago +4

    Great video as always. I would love to have a freeze drier too. Keep up the great work.

  • Admiral Preparedness
    Admiral Preparedness 8 months ago +13

    I'm saving up for a Harvest Right unit. Your videos are super informative and I thank you for sharing your experiences with your freeze dryer with us!!

    • Dana Kelly
      Dana Kelly 2 months ago

      Best investment ever!!! We love ours!

    • Tony Pizza
      Tony Pizza 4 months ago +1

      Admiral Preparedness I took out a loan 1 year ago and started drying everything I could. Get it quick because food prices and availability will get tight. Now I have a great stash. The interest on the loan I consider an investment. Time is your enemy.

    • Admiral Preparedness
      Admiral Preparedness 7 months ago +1

      You will be my first "go to" person!!@Retired at 40- Live.Life.Simple.

    • Old Frugal One Hyper-Drive Movement
      Old Frugal One Hyper-Drive Movement 8 months ago +5

      Hope you can get yours soon. I feel it's a wise investment. Personally I bought the large unit with the oil less pump. I love the oil less pump and for me it's worth the extra money. All I have to do for maintenance every 10 batches is pour 1/4 cup of rubbing alcohol 2 or 3 times down the hose with the pump running to flush out any gunk build up. So easy to do. I love doing all kinds of foods and packing them away. Ben running it almost 24/7 since December of 2018. It will be nice to have more than just rice and beans in my preps.

    • Hans McQ
      Hans McQ 8 months ago +2

      Harvest right does have a layaway program.

  • DakotaRose56
    DakotaRose56 8 months ago +8

    Have you tried coffee yet? Thanks for sharing!

    • Emily H
      Emily H 8 months ago +1

      @Old Frugal One Hyper-Drive Movement results are in on freeze dried brewed coffee. The texture comes out very different than powdered milk etcetera it is like a foam do not blow on it do not walk too fast with your tray it will blow right off. I reconstituted it and it turned out great it's not granules like you buy freeze dried coffee from the store it is actually like a foam. I will post some pictures. Actually I don't know how to add pictures to this post that I would recommend it I'm going to make more I got a whole gallon of coffee in a small quart size bag and I could have fit more in there. When you mix it with water you don't even have to stir it it dissolves right away

    • Emily H
      Emily H 8 months ago

      @DakotaRose56 sure will

    • Old Frugal One Hyper-Drive Movement
      Old Frugal One Hyper-Drive Movement 8 months ago +1

      @Emily H Yes, interesting. I too would like to hear your opinion. If you think it's worth while or just to stick with instant store bought.

    • DakotaRose56
      DakotaRose56 8 months ago

      I am particular about my coffee and would prefer my own.@Old Frugal One Hyper-Drive Movement

    • DakotaRose56
      DakotaRose56 8 months ago +1

      Can you share your results? Would love to know if it turns out like store bought.@Emily H