Mucky Secrets - Part 10 - Frogfishes - Lembeh Strait

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  • Published on Jun 11, 2014
  • Frogfishes. Part 10 of my documentary, "Mucky Secrets", about the fascinating marine creatures of the Lembeh Strait in Indonesia. Watch the full 90-minute documentary at www.youtube.com/watch?v=nJMZ6r...

    Frogfishes of the family Antennariidae, are a type of anglerfish in the order Lophiiformes. They are rare at most dive destinations but common in the Lembeh Strait.

    Frogfishes such as the painted frogfish, Antennarius pictus, are highly camouflaged to resemble sponges or rocks covered in algae. They have an amazing ability to adapt their skin color and texture to blend in with their surroundings, and numerous color variations of the same species can be found.

    Rather than blending into the surroundings, the warty frogfish, Antennarius maculatus, mimics toxic sea slugs to deter predators.

    Although frogfishes can swim, they usually walk around on their pectoral fins which have evolved into arm-like limbs complete with an elbow-like joint.

    Frogfishes are generally ambush predators, and have a very clever hunting technique. Their first dorsal spine, the illicium, ends in a fleshy lure known as an esca, which resembles a variety of marine creatures depending on the species. The frogfish waves the illicium like a fishing rod to attract prey. The appearance of the esca is useful in distinguishing between species. If the illicium and esca are removed, the frogfish can grow a replacement.

    The illicium is not always deployed, and opportunistic frogfishes will snatch what food they can. They will often just lie in wait, their upturned mouths ready to devour unsuspecting bypassers.

    We meet a giant frogfish, Antennarius commerson, taking up a more elevated position on a tube sponge, from which to ambush prey.

    A warty frogfish appears nervous as it finds itself in the path of a highly venomous flower urchin, Toxopneustes pileolus, before the urchin finally changed course.

    The striated frogfish, Antennarius striatus, is a real star amongst Lembeh critters, and high on most divers' list of favorites. Many examples in the area bear long skin filaments and are known amongst the dive community as "hairy frogfish". They are usually found on the open sand amongst algae. The esca resembles a polychaete worm. A black phase of the striated frogfish, without significant skin appendages, is encountered. Its possible that the filaments may be seasonally shed.

    Finally we encounter a tiny juvenile painted frogfish, just a few millimeters in length.

    There are English captions showing either the full narration or the common and scientific names of the marine life, along with the dive site names.

    The full Mucky Secrets nature documentary features a huge diversity of weird and wonderful marine animals including frogfish, nudibranchs, scorpionfish, crabs, shrimps, moray eels, seahorses, octopus, cuttlefish etc..

    Thanks to Kevin MacLeod of www.incompetech.com for the music track, "Babylon", which is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Unported license.

    Thanks to the staff and keen-eyed divemasters of Two Fish Divers ( www.twofishdivers.com ), for accommodation, diving services and critter-spotting.

    The video was shot by Nick Hope with a Sony HVR-Z1P HDV camera in a Light & Motion Bluefin HD housing with Light & Motion Elite lights and a flat port. A Century +3.5 diopter was used for the most of the macro footage.

    I have more scuba diving videos and underwater footage on my website at:
    www.bubblevision.com

    I post updates about my videos here:
    bubblevision
    google.com/+bubblevision
    nicholashope
    bubblevision.tumblr.com

    Full list of marine life and dive sites featured in this video:

    00:00 Painted Frogfish, Antennarius pictus, Jahir
    00:13 Painted Frogfish, Antennarius pictus, Police Pier
    00:26 Painted Frogfish, Antennarius pictus, Aer Perang
    00:40 Spotfin Frogfish (tentative), Antennarius nummifer, Retak Larry
    01:01 Warty Frogfish, Antennarius maculatus, Jahir
    01:16 Painted Frogfish, Antennarius pictus, Jahir
    01:42 Warty Frogfish, Antennarius maculatus, Jahir
    01:56 Painted Frogfish (juvenile), Antennarius pictus, Makawide
    02:06 Painted Frogfish, Antennarius pictus, Jahir
    02:18 Painted Frogfish (juvenile), Antennarius pictus, Makawide
    02:28 Painted Frogfish, Antennarius pictus, Hairball
    02:38 Giant Frogfish, Antennarius commerson, Aer Perang
    02:58 Warty Frogfish, Antennarius maculatus, Jahir
    03:03 Flower Urchin, Toxopneustes pileolus, Jahir
    03:27 Striated Frogfish, Antennarius striatus, TK 2
    04:16 Striated Frogfish, Antennarius striatus, Jahir
    04:30 Painted Frogfish (juvenile), Antennarius pictus, Hairball
    05:04 Spotted Parrotfish (juvenile), Cetoscarus ocellatus, Tanjung Kusu-Kusu

Comments • 19

  • Bubble Vision
    Bubble Vision  7 years ago +1

    The full 90-minute documentary is now online:

  • Brandon Costello
    Brandon Costello 2 years ago +2

    I’m a very advanced hobbyist. I just came across this channel and I think it is one of the best I’ve ever seen. So informative regarding the natural habitats and lives of fish and invertebrates commonly found in the hobby. Bravo!

  • Bubble Vision
    Bubble Vision  7 years ago +12

    Part 10 of my documentary, "Mucky Secrets", about the fascinating marine life of the Lembeh Strait in Indonesia.

  • Jörn Bude
    Jörn Bude 7 years ago +2

    Großartig!!!

  • Olga Márton
    Olga Márton 7 years ago +2

    Fantasztikus sorozat. Hálásan köszönöm.:-)

  • Nadège Carletti
    Nadège Carletti 7 years ago +2

    Merci beaucoup : pour les images (elles sont magnifiques) et les explications

  • Bubble Vision
    Bubble Vision  7 years ago +3

    The narration, the names of the dive sites, and the common and scientific names of the marine life are available in subtitles by clicking the button under the bottom right of the video.

  • D Whatley
    D Whatley 7 years ago +2

    Nick, Can the frog fishes change color and texture like an octopus or is it a slow process based upon length of time in an environment or are they born with a specific set of colors and appendages.

  • Andrew Wilner, MD
    Andrew Wilner, MD 7 years ago +1

    Excellent voiceover and images! Thank you!

  • Bubble Vision
    Bubble Vision  7 years ago

    The next part (part 11) is now live:

  • zhoor wrood
    zhoor wrood 7 years ago

    سبحان الله ، ولله في خلقة شؤون ، شكراً لك

  • Ann Nuthanun
    Ann Nuthanun 6 years ago +1

    แบบนี้ในไทยคงไม่มี แปลกดีคะ ผิวลักษณะเหมือนไม้ แต่หน้าเหมือนคน เพิ่งจะเคยเห็นนี่แหละ

  • Khalidur Rhahman
    Khalidur Rhahman 6 years ago +7

    Very nice

  • clockguy2
    clockguy2 7 years ago

    Product of evolution...Yeah right.