How to Fix Cassette Tapes The Right Way. Open, Splice, Repair Like a Pro.

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  • Published on Mar 30, 2020
  • There are a lot of videos about cassette repair, but this one shows the right way to easily fix difficult-to-open prerecorded cassettes, splice them and repair the pressure pad.

    Learn how to splice a tap. Learn how to replace a broken pressure pad. Learn how to fix a tape.

    For a link to some of the items I use and recommend for tape repair and deck service, visit my Amazon affiliate shop page: www.amazon.com/shop/fluxconde...

  • Science & TechnologyScience & Technology

Comments • 155

  • Flux Condenser Vintage Audio Electronics

    For a link to some of the items I use and recommend for tape repair and deck service, visit my Amazon affiliate shop page: www.amazon.com/shop/fluxcondenservintageaudioelectronics?tag=onamzfluxcond-20&linkCode=ic7

  • Jim Bugg
    Jim Bugg 10 months ago +2

    I first was interested in how to repair the pressure pad. Your instructions and sources of material were very helpful. Great video. Loved seeing someone else using cassette players. Loved the Nakamichi cassette drive! One question: if super glue is used on the inside points of the plastic case, won't that make it impossible to reuse? I assume you would just then move tape over to a new unmarked case, correct? Are replacements available that screw together?

    • Flux Condenser Vintage Audio Electronics
      Flux Condenser Vintage Audio Electronics  10 months ago

      Thanks, Jim. Glad you found the video helpful. As far as getting the cassette open again after using super glue, it won’t be a problem if you used glue on the outer edge of the shell if you repeat the step with the Xacto blade. That’ll cut through the glue. But yes, if you use a lot of glue on parts of the shell that you can’t get a blade into, it might make reopening the shell difficult. Replacement shells are absolutely still available. Check eBay.

  • oddyoh
    oddyoh 3 months ago +4

    Great video. Straight forward, no nonsense approach to this common problem. You’re the Bob Ross of cassette repair, an artist! Happy Accidents!

  • Spoon Noodle
    Spoon Noodle Year ago +9

    This video was a huge help. I recently bought a two tape album and both broke instantly where the magnetic tape connects to the plastic tape when played. I tried the method of opening the tape on an old home-made tape to see if I could do it without damaging it, but didn't have the right tool and was a bit impatient. I managed however to make use of this tape's plastic section to fish out the plastic tape on the tapes I was repairing, since the magnetic section was already exposed. It took a good few hours but somehow it worked. I could then follow your advice on how to repair them from there.

  • Dead Relative Collective
    Dead Relative Collective 8 months ago +6

    Thanks for taking the time in sharing your tips and experience. I like the way you kept in some of the problems that can arise! Trouble is now I want a nakamichi rx-505!

  • Darren Brana
    Darren Brana Year ago +5

    Very good instructions easy to follow keep up the good work thanks.

  • dr. pickle
    dr. pickle 3 months ago +2

    thank you SO much for this video! i've recently started buying some cassettes here and there, and it's been an absolute pain trying to find thorough resources on repairing and maintaining cassettes. this video was incredibly helpful, and i'll be sure to check your channel first the next time i need any kind of audiophile help!

  • Linda Wolff/Kashmir27

    You can do this with VCR tapes as well, there’s a couple of extra parts in them, mainly the locks on the tape reels, and sometimes a little T piece that goes between them that have to be set in accurately, but the principle is the same. And most VCR tapes have screws.

  • ุ
     6 months ago +5

    I just started collecting tapes and this ended up happening to me. I don't yet have the courage to do this. Still I'm glad i found such a detailed video on how to fix it, so when i feel more comfortable i can repair mine.

  • Dominic James
    Dominic James 11 months ago +1

    First time watching a video in 720p60! I have half a dozen cassettes to work on already from 1972-94! That's an idea for a lockdown project! Thanks mate! 👍🏻👂🏻

    • Dominic James
      Dominic James 11 months ago

      I AM A GOD!!! 😉

    • Flux Condenser Vintage Audio Electronics
      Flux Condenser Vintage Audio Electronics  11 months ago

      Dominic, the first step is admitting you have a problem. So kudos to you for starting your journey toward redemption. I’m hoping the cassette gods will be kind to you.

    • Dominic James
      Dominic James 11 months ago +1

      Well I'm glad you saw the humour there but it was of poor taste. I was also afraid that you'd mistake me for an Australian. On a more serious note, I admit I have had a destructive relationship with my cassettes. Many of them were simply wasted and beyond repair. Some were home recordings and sadly irreplacable. There are only two surving home cassette recordings that I recently discovered-one segment dates from 1990! So I hope to make good and put the past behind me. @Flux Condenser Vintage Audio Electronics

    • Flux Condenser Vintage Audio Electronics
      Flux Condenser Vintage Audio Electronics  11 months ago +1

      @Dominic James Ha! You’re clearly British. I should have known from the “mate.” I really walked right into that one! In the US, piles does mean the same, but we just don’t use that term often in that way. But I now realize that what I said, to your ears, amounts to, “I’ve got hemorrhoids waiting for my attention as well.” In addition to you having good taste, you’ve also got a good sense of humor.

    • Dominic James
      Dominic James 11 months ago +1

      Aaaaand...

      I'm sorry that you have piles!!! 💣💥👊🏻😅😆😂

  • cellokratzer
    cellokratzer 10 months ago +1

    Thanks a lot! I didn't follow everything as professional as you showed, but it was enough to fix a 42 year old cassette (adhesive tape on both sides had come loose..)to run it once for copying.....

  • mercurialmagictrees
    mercurialmagictrees Year ago +2

    Excellent instructions. I was able to remove the split the shell on my sonic youth "day dream nation" fairly easily pulling apart the shell by putting a small screw driver in holes on bottom of the shell.

    There is no leader on the side that is available to me. The tape split at the very beginning and the hub has nothing attached to it. What should I do ? I was thinking I could get the splice tape it to the hub and underneath the magnetic tape. Is that a good idea?

    • mercurialmagictrees
      mercurialmagictrees Year ago +1

      @Flux Condenser Vintage Audio Electronics cool thanks for your input. This channel has great potential, keep up the good work. I'm sure if you reached out to them and asked them they would consider some arrangement since it helps reach more customers.

      I will buy the splicing kit and leader tape just in case. I'm surprised I'm putting in so much effort with cassettes but they're fun and the sound is unique.

      I have a 1980's Teac w-310c stereo cassette deck. I bought it super cheap locally and it works great. I'm glad because it wasn't tested before buying so I was lucky haha.

      I also have a GE portable cassette player(bought used locally for cheap as well). That is the machine that gave me the trouble in the first place haha. There is a slight hum most time (unless I adjust the headphone jack or set it on table a certain way) The fast forward and rewind are bit too aggressive so I have to be carefull or just avoid using those buttons haha.

    • Flux Condenser Vintage Audio Electronics
      Flux Condenser Vintage Audio Electronics  Year ago +1

      mercurialmagictrees I think the splicing kit will definitely come in handy and it includes a great block and good quality tape. The leader tape is good to have, too, but for most repairs, the leader tape in the cassette you’re fixing will still be usable. Having some spare leader tape around might come in handy, though, if the leader gets eaten by the machine and becomes unusable, or when fixing that rare cassette that doesn’t have a leader and adding one is a good idea. You may never need it, but since you’re buying the repair kit anyway, and the leader is so cheap, I’d say go for it and you’ll have it just in case. Sorry, my channel is so tiny that nobody’s reached out to me to offer any discounts to offer my viewers. Thanks so much for tolerating the ads and supporting the channel. Much appreciated! I’ve recently become monetized and am experimenting with allowing the ads. Hope they’re not to bothersome. I’ll never make back even a tiny fraction of what I spend to create this channel, but I figure if I can make a few bucks that pays for my solder and a couple of tools every year, I’ll take it!

    • mercurialmagictrees
      mercurialmagictrees Year ago +1

      By the way I clicked the multiple advertisements to help with ad revenue for the channel.

    • mercurialmagictrees
      mercurialmagictrees Year ago +1

      www.splicit.com/Cassette-Leader-Tape-p/lt-125.htm this is the item I'm talking about.

    • mercurialmagictrees
      mercurialmagictrees Year ago +1

      @Flux Condenser Vintage Audio Electronics yeah I was considering buying a leader cassette for _2.75 on splic it.com along with the cassette splic kit. Will the leader cassette be usefull when reparing cassettes? I can link to product. Do you have promo code or anything with splicit.com?

  • David Herron
    David Herron 4 months ago +1

    I think it's pretty important to work with very slow moving super gel glue. That cheap stuff flows like water and will destroy everything lol

  • Unul Oarecare
    Unul Oarecare 9 months ago +1

    Thank you from Romania, Brasov - followed your instruction and for one cassette by opening it I found out that one of the plastic roles was off, still inside but the pin that was holding that was missing - used a sewing pin to manufacture one and everything was back in place - this cassette is coming from my dead father-in-law so it has sentimental value - loved the joke about hemoroides - piles, never realised that piles is the equivalent of that - translation in Romanian/traducere romana - multumesc din Brasov, Romania - am urmat instructiunile de aici si la o caseta am descoperit in interior ca una din rolele de plastic cazuse si axul ei disparuse - am facut un alt ax dintr-un ac de cusut si acum totul e la loc - casetele astea sunt de la socrul meu care a decedat si au valoare sentimentala - am apreciat gluma despre hemoroizi - piles (mormane) - nu am stiut ca piles poate insemna si hemoroizi pt britanici

  • captianbubble
    captianbubble Year ago +2

    I have cassette tapes that are mostly sealed ones that need repair. They all have that pressure pad issue. And another tape just randomly snapped at the very end. The tape is sealed too.
    Some of the tapes I fixed, have the snapping right where the Lier is, because, the sticky thing comes off.
    Other tapes are really easy to repair. With screws in it of course. I also made a mini tape repair kit for tape parts.

  • oldradios.
    oldradios. Year ago +16

    Why is it always the tapes with the most interesting stuff on the label always seems to come apart at the spool? Lol. I got a bunch of cassettes from a garage sale that had someone’s recordings from 1971-1974 and tried to play the oldest tape in the bunch, and the leader popped right off the spool and the take up reel was spinning rapidly. Murphy’s Law I guess? 🤷

  • Hamsterino
    Hamsterino 12 days ago

    Hi! I own a few magnetic tapes from the ‘70s and I was wondering if there was any way that I could save them from ripping apart (I should mention that even if I touch it lightly the tape rips in pieces)

  • RFD603
    RFD603 Year ago +9

    Thanks, helped me fix my Pink Floyd’s the Wall Tape

  • Robbie Perry
    Robbie Perry 8 months ago +1

    What splicer are you using? It really stays in the groove without any extra help!

  • Oklahoma Roserock
    Oklahoma Roserock Year ago +3

    Going to use this to fix my new Heart tape. Thanks :)

  • Essie Bryant
    Essie Bryant Year ago

    Thanks for sharing you do need a steady hand and to be patient and I'd like to have somebody to do my tapes for me. I got quite a few needs to be fixed so it's going to take quite a bit of time but I will send for the kit through eBay so that I can get busy because I have tapes that are very dear to me my own piano playing and singing and I would love to preserve it , always save it and try and have it transferred to a CD so thanks again great work! Do you know how I would be able to do that transfer my music from a cassette tape to a CD?

    • Flux Condenser Vintage Audio Electronics
      Flux Condenser Vintage Audio Electronics  Year ago +1

      Yes, those options exist, but tend to be fairly low quality and also won’t provide Dolby. The best quality will be had by connecting a good quality deck to the computer using the computer’s sound card or an external DAC. It’s a more versatile solution as well as it can be used to transfer audio from LPs (using a preamp with phono setting), 8-tracks or pretty much anything with an analog audio output.

    • mercurialmagictrees
      mercurialmagictrees Year ago +1

      I think there is cassette players that allow audio transfer to mp3 through a USB cable. That seems to be the easiest way to get it on a computer. Then you could create a CD from the mp3 audio your music platform (iTunes /windows media player)

    • Flux Condenser Vintage Audio Electronics
      Flux Condenser Vintage Audio Electronics  Year ago

      Essie, good luck repairing all those tapes. Yes, it requires a lot of patience, but it’ll be worth it. Transferring your cassettes to CD is a bit of a long subject to cover in the comments, but I can give you a general idea of your options. To do it yourself, you have the option of using a computer. You’ll need a sound card that allows you to input the audio from your cassette player, recording software and a CD burner. If you don’t have a CD burner, you can also use this option to simply convert the tapes to audio files such as MP3. Another option is to find an audio component that has CD recording and tape playback in one unit. There are actually units still being made that offer this feature and you can buy them from Amazon, etc. Note, that newer units don’t offer true Dolby (the licensing for the technology is no longer available), but the better ones will have noise reduction that should be somewhat compatible. You may find some older used equipment that has cassette and CD burning in one with real Dolby, but I’m not certain. The final option would be a transfer-service company which would accept your tapes via mail and transfer them for you. Hope this helps.

  • Deb
    Deb 8 months ago +3

    Your patience pays off!

  • redblazehorse
    redblazehorse 10 months ago

    Most of mine have screws that hold the case together. I use glue to splice.

  • Steve Maricic
    Steve Maricic 3 months ago +1

    Very thorough.

  • sickofthissh
    sickofthissh Year ago +5

    I just got my The Doors Classics cracked in two and NOTHING broke. Dropped some glue in the top holes and snapped it back together. I use sponge and double sided tape for new pads.

  • Astro XL
    Astro XL 6 months ago +1

    My problem is that my cassettes keep going muffled. They dont start off muffled but they get muffled. I think the tape is off track. I dont think its the pressure pad because the pressure pad is in place and wont move

  • Chris A
    Chris A Year ago

    Question would the super glue break the case if you needed to go back and repair it?

    • Flux Condenser Vintage Audio Electronics
      Flux Condenser Vintage Audio Electronics  Year ago +1

      Chris, if you repeat the process as I showed using an Xacto to score the seam, there shouldn’t be any issue getting the case back open. Simply prying it open without cutting into the seam first, though, could result in a crack. Hope this helps.

  • Wendy Orange
    Wendy Orange 11 months ago +1

    Do you do repairs for others? If not, how do I find someone in my area with this skillset?

  • A A
    A A Year ago

    Had no idea about the benefits of using the 45° angle, will try later. Good video!

  • Retro Lover
    Retro Lover Year ago +1

    Which brand and size of adhesive tape would you recommend here ?

    • Flux Condenser Vintage Audio Electronics
      Flux Condenser Vintage Audio Electronics  Year ago +1

      I don’t have a brand preference. Just get something that’s specifically designed for splicing the type of tape you’re repairing. Cassette splicing tape is frequently labeled as ⅛” and 8-track and reel-to-reel tape is usually specified as ¼”. Hope this helps.

  • Markus Ziman
    Markus Ziman 10 months ago

    Excellent video Flux Condenser Vintage Audio Electronics!!!! May I ask where to get these tools and accessories to fix tapes? how to fix a tape that has detached from the reel? thank you very much in advance for your reply

    • Flux Condenser Vintage Audio Electronics
      Flux Condenser Vintage Audio Electronics  10 months ago +1

      Markus, there’s usually a pin or tab insert. If you can’t locate one on your reel, you could consider buying some spare reels to replace the ones you have. Again, look on eBay for spare parts. You may consider taping the leader to the reel as well. Good luck!

    • Markus Ziman
      Markus Ziman 10 months ago

      @Flux Condenser Vintage Audio Electronics The following question is probably a dumb one but i am asking you just in case. It is a very valuable and very old tape, just in case the plastic insert was not there or was damaged, are there any spare parts for this particular piece of plastic? I have several other tapes with the same problem and never dared to open them as I did know how to fix them. Thank you very much in advance for your reply.

    • Markus Ziman
      Markus Ziman 10 months ago

      @Flux Condenser Vintage Audio Electronics Thank you very much. Sorry, i watched the video without the audio last night while I was copying some cassette tapes and listening them at the same time, my bad.

    • Flux Condenser Vintage Audio Electronics
      Flux Condenser Vintage Audio Electronics  10 months ago +1

      Markus, I believe I mentioned where I got the tools in the video. Search eBay and you’ll find lots of options.

      If your tape has separated from the reel, look for the plastic insert which clips into the reel and holds the tape in place. Slide it out and then use it to re-clip the tape to the reel.

      Make sure you use a leader tape to connect to the reel as the magnetic tape will eventually break if it’s attached this way. Then, splice the leader tape to the magnetic tape. Hope this helps.

  • billc6955
    billc6955 Month ago +1

    I used your video to fix my Joe Cocker cassette...thanks

  • Ronaldo Rodriguez
    Ronaldo Rodriguez Year ago +2

    The main problem I'm having using scotch tape is any tape deck I tried playing on, all autostopped right at the splice. Is the tape too thick or is the play head grabbing the edge of the tape? I've repaired a dozen tapes and every single one had the autostop issue.

    • Ronaldo Rodriguez
      Ronaldo Rodriguez Year ago +2

      @Flux Condenser Vintage Audio Electronics Everything you described I've done correctly, and I did find out it was me splicing the tape on the music side! Oh well, I'll need to fix the other tapes. Thanks for your response! No clue about tape gap tolerance.

      also I'm using the normal brand of scotch tape from Walmart.

    • Flux Condenser Vintage Audio Electronics
      Flux Condenser Vintage Audio Electronics  Year ago +2

      Ronaldo, is the scotch tape on the back of the magnetic tape (no music side) or the front (music side)? The tape should be on the back side. Is the magnetic tape cut at the seam or is there an flap of tape remaining? There should be no flap of tape. Is the scotch tape cut exactly to the width of the magnetic tape and perfectly lined up with it? If there’s any scotch tape extending beyond the magnetic tape or if the tape path isn’t completely straight at the splice, that could trigger the auto stop. Also, make sure there’s no sticky residue. If none of those things are present, then yes, I would conclude that the scotch tape is either too thick or rigid and that’s why the auto stop is getting triggered.

  • Raffaele Vitucci
    Raffaele Vitucci 23 days ago +1

    Good video, I like your cassette deck too.

  • George Johnson
    George Johnson Year ago +2

    Do you have a feature on reattatching leader to hub?

    • Flux Condenser Vintage Audio Electronics
      Flux Condenser Vintage Audio Electronics  Year ago +2

      Not specifically, but generally this is an easy fix. In the hub there’s a small insert that can be removed. Remove the insert, align the leader with the hub and snap the insert back in to hold the leader in place.

  • Kennynva
    Kennynva 10 months ago +1

    I have learned to take the right sized screwdriver and twist it in the top holes of the cassette, the holes that decide if you can record or not on the tape...that will start the opening, then work your way around.

    • Flux Condenser Vintage Audio Electronics
      Flux Condenser Vintage Audio Electronics  10 months ago

      Ouch! That sounds like a bad idea to me. It’s gonna smell horrible. It’s gonna leave an unsightly hole with deformed plastic that’ll have to be trimmed down. It might deform the shell permanently so it no longer fits in the machine. And, it may damage the tape inside. Open the shells, remove the tape and cut some nice clean slots with a blade or Dremel if you must. Or, transfer the tape to a suitable chrome shell.

    • Kennynva
      Kennynva 10 months ago

      @Flux Condenser Vintage Audio Electronics What do you think about using a soldering iron to make the holes in the top so it can auto read some these cassettes that read normal that are chrome.

    • Flux Condenser Vintage Audio Electronics
      Flux Condenser Vintage Audio Electronics  10 months ago

      Kennynva, that’s a common method as well. I know many have good luck with prying and that’s great if it works for you. I always go for the blade method myself as I consider it less likely to mar or damage the shell.

  • DesignCutters
    DesignCutters Year ago +1

    I have a Cobra announce cassette that is a 20 second tape which loops, for an old answering machine. The tape got snagged inside itself and I had to open the case. Now I can't figure out how to rewind the tape so it can be listened to. Have you ever done this?

    • Flux Condenser Vintage Audio Electronics
      Flux Condenser Vintage Audio Electronics  Year ago

      I did a quick search for “cassette tape loop” and it seems that there are a number of ways to accomplish this, but none seem to use a method similar to 8-track. They simply use various schemes to loop the tape inside the cartridge. I’d suggest doing the same search on Google and look at the images to see if you see a scheme that will work for your tape. To get 20 seconds with a simple loop, your tape player will have to work at a slower than standard speed. Or, the tape will have to take a more complicated path to allow for 20 seconds worth of tape. Good luck.

    • Flux Condenser Vintage Audio Electronics
      Flux Condenser Vintage Audio Electronics  Year ago

      It sounds like yours may loop similarly to an 8-track. If so, you may want to watch a video showing how 8-tracks loop on the spool from the outside and leave the spool from the inside. If I find out more, I’ll let you know.

  • Joseph Mullen
    Joseph Mullen 11 months ago +1

    hi my tape got twisted very bad can you tell me how to fix this thanks

    • Joseph Mullen
      Joseph Mullen 11 months ago

      @Flux Condenser Vintage Audio Electronics hi thanks very much maxell and tdk I used alot this tape i told you about was a very cheap brand of tape reason i wanted to open it was the play head area on the tape it had wore off don't know the name of it but the tape won't play without it properly thanks very much.

    • Flux Condenser Vintage Audio Electronics
      Flux Condenser Vintage Audio Electronics  11 months ago

      @Joseph Mullen Sorry to hear that. At this point, if the tape is stretched I wouldn’t recommend trying to use that section of tape anymore as it’ll just get jammed in your player. A slightly crumpled tape can sometimes make it through a machine, but anything beyond that won’t. If you want to attempt to salvage what’s left of the tape, I’d recommend using the techniques I show in the video to splice out the damaged tape and connect what’s left of the good area. You’ll have a gap, but it’ll be something, at least.

      Additionally, if the tape was chewed up by your machine, it may be time to think about having it serviced as it may ruin additional tapes. The main issue will be your pinch roller(s) which can only be cleaned so many times before needing replacement. I have a newer video on my channel showing the repair of an old Ampex deck where I replaced the pinch roller and it improved a lot of issues. You may want to check that out.

    • Joseph Mullen
      Joseph Mullen 11 months ago

      @Flux Condenser Vintage Audio Electronics yes half of it twisted on me it went thin aswell , should have wore gloves like the use in hospital, the tape kept sticking to my fingers.

    • Flux Condenser Vintage Audio Electronics
      Flux Condenser Vintage Audio Electronics  11 months ago

      Sure, I can try to help. Have you been able to unravel the mess? Note, though, that if the tape has been stretched or crumpled, it will never really play properly again.

  • Nikhil Mahajan
    Nikhil Mahajan 2 months ago +1

    Hey, my tape wont spin in the walkman its jammed what to do?

  • Kathy Palmer
    Kathy Palmer 9 months ago +1

    HELP - Today a tape of my Grandfather telling the family history broke at the beginning of Side One at the Take-up Reel/Supply wheel. I attempted to open the cassette with the blade and STOPPED. This is too precious for me to break. Do you fix tapes? If not, do you know where I could send it for a repair.

    • Flux Condenser Vintage Audio Electronics
      Flux Condenser Vintage Audio Electronics  9 months ago

      Kathy, I wish you luck getting the tape repaired. I don’t take in work as I do this for a hobby only. I’m not certain who could do the repair for you. I’m sure there’s someone out there if you decide to not continue with the repair yourself. Perhaps a Google search will bring something up.

      If you do continue with the repair, and carefully follow the instructions, you really shouldn’t have any issues. Additionally, if you’re not sentimentally attached to the cassette’s shell, once you get the tape opened and fixed, you could opt to transfer it to a replacement shell that uses screws to seal the case. That’ll make completing the repair easier and if it breaks again, you’ll have nice, easy access. You could sacrifice another tape to get such a shell, or buy a replacement shell which are available online. Good luck!

  • Dave Lee
    Dave Lee Year ago +2

    can i get a link to the pad replace kit?

    • Dave Lee
      Dave Lee Year ago +1

      @Flux Condenser Vintage Audio Electronics Ty

    • Flux Condenser Vintage Audio Electronics
      Flux Condenser Vintage Audio Electronics  Year ago +2

      Sure thing: www.ebay.com/itm/25-Brown-Pressure-Pads-Cassette-Tape-Repair-Peel-and-Stick-Felt-Free-Sleeves/392881992224?hash=item5b79977220:g:Q1EAAOSwP5JdH-~W

  • bob's bit's
    bob's bit's 5 months ago

    hi get a vine pin or needle use it to put blue on around the cassette i have a jig i put tape in when glue sets i have done alot taps over the years there is 1/8 edit tape
    and block you can get

  • Mr synth dude
    Mr synth dude 11 months ago +1

    Anyone know how to repair a cassette that sounds like a dirty vinyl record ?

    • Mr synth dude
      Mr synth dude 11 months ago

      @Flux Condenser Vintage Audio Electronics its kate bush so nothing rare. Gonna leave it alone now as done all I can. Got blank casseetes so gonna make some albums. Glad I had them as the price of new blank cassettes are crazy

    • Flux Condenser Vintage Audio Electronics
      Flux Condenser Vintage Audio Electronics  11 months ago

      @Mr synth dude That’s actually a good idea. I’ve never tried it myself, but I’ve thought of it as an option. If the tape is collectible, you may not want to do this as it will lessen its value even if the sound quality improves. If it’s an average tape, though, and you want to use the original shell with a better recording, I say go for it. But, yeah, you’ll be limited by the quality of your tape, the recorder and source. And yes, if the tape is very worn, you may not get a better result.

      Another option would be to record the program to a good quality blank tape and then transfer that tape to the original shell. That might be your best bet. It’ll give you a chance to experiment and not worry about destroying the original tape. And, you can transfer the original tape to the blank shell for safekeeping. Let us know how it turns out.

    • Mr synth dude
      Mr synth dude 11 months ago +1

      @Flux Condenser Vintage Audio Electronics have another idea. If you have done all the steps to clean and a specific cassette still sounds like dirty vinyl will recording over it fix the issue or is the actual tape worn out ?

    • Flux Condenser Vintage Audio Electronics
      Flux Condenser Vintage Audio Electronics  11 months ago

      My pleasure. Take care.

    • Mr synth dude
      Mr synth dude 11 months ago +1

      @Flux Condenser Vintage Audio Electronics one didn't have any sponge. No wonder it didn't sound good. Learnt something today. Thank you

  • Young_of_the_mill
    Young_of_the_mill 4 months ago +1

    How to lubricate a squeaky tape?

    • Flux Condenser Vintage Audio Electronics
      Flux Condenser Vintage Audio Electronics  4 months ago +1

      Hm. There are a few possible causes for this. The pressure pad may be the issue. The tape itself may require lubrication. Or perhaps the rollers in the shell. Some people claim tape head or tape treatments such as those from Last Factory will solve the issue. Others say replace or repair the shell. I don’t have any experience fixing squeaky tapes other than transferring the tape to a better shell. As far as treatments that claim to lubricate the tape, I can’t comment on their effectiveness. Also, and this is probably obvious, make sure the problem is the tape and not the machine. Good luck.

  • Mike Mat
    Mike Mat Year ago +1

    But Holy Cow,,!! That must be a Zeppelin Jam tape,, the way yer going down to the tightest degree !! But I love it,, tks

    • Flux Condenser Vintage Audio Electronics
      Flux Condenser Vintage Audio Electronics  Year ago

      I’ve had that Fleetwood Mac live album on vinyl since I was a kid and while it’s not one of their most popular albums I absolutely love it. Yeah, this tape probably ain’t worth $10, but I really wanted to listen to it ;-)

  • Fai Lam
    Fai Lam 5 months ago

    Items in Amazon currently unavailable :(

  • Vahid Gholami
    Vahid Gholami Year ago +1

    I have à problem with my cassette, sound is like wave its variable . Go down and up, do you can help me for repaire my cassette 🙏🏻🙏🏻

    • Flux Condenser Vintage Audio Electronics
      Flux Condenser Vintage Audio Electronics  Year ago

      Do all cassettes play poorly in your machine or just one individual tape? If you’re having trouble with all cassettes, the machine may be at fault. You could have issues with belts slipping or a worn pinch roller. The pinch roller needs to be perfectly round, if not, playback speed will vary as you describe.

      Consider cleaning the pinch roller using a Q-tip and a liquid solution made specifically for that purpose. Pinch roller cleaners are available online. I don’t recommend alcohol for pinch rollers, but alcohol can be used on the tape heads. If you determine that the issue is the pinch roller, and cleaning doesn’t improve the situation, you’ll have to replace the roller. If that’s the case it’s a good idea to replace all the belts as well.

      If only one of your tapes is exhibiting this issue, first inspect the pressure pad and make sure it’s in good shape and secured properly. Check the shell and make sure it isn’t warped. If it is, you’ll need to transfer the tape to a replacement shell. Looking at the magnetic tape itself, make sure that it’s flat and not curled. If it is, or looks worn or distorted in any way, the tape will probably never play well again.

      If the tape seems fine externally, the shell will have to be opened to investigate what’s causing the problem. Tapes often have two slip-sheets between the tape spools and shell, so check that they aren’t worn or causing friction. Also check that the tape path is correct as shown in the video and that the wheels are spinning freely.

      Good luck!

  • Alastair Frankland
    Alastair Frankland Year ago +1

    Not bad man.

  • Harry burnett
    Harry burnett 2 months ago +1

    I was doing this in the 80s

  • Toss
    Toss 10 months ago +1

    change the speed to 1.25 :}

  • John Lomasney
    John Lomasney 7 months ago +1

    Tedious patience needed

  • Алекс Мавр

    Видео для чайников

    • Алекс Мавр
      Алекс Мавр Year ago +3

      In my opinion, new people do not do this much already, but those who did it for those it is only nostalgia, collecting. And these people can already do all this... good luck to you.

    • Flux Condenser Vintage Audio Electronics
      Flux Condenser Vintage Audio Electronics  Year ago +1

      Your English is actually pretty good. Here in the US, back in the 80s and 90s, many more people had cassette repair skills as for many years, they were the most-sold format. There are far fewer “experts” these days.

    • Алекс Мавр
      Алекс Мавр Year ago

      Yes, I know English poorly, so I tried to write as well as I could. Just in our country, back in the USSR, everyone could do it. Not everyone had such devices, so they actually did it on their knees, and it all played as it should. I myself led discos at that time, and I sometimes had to do this, and I didn't want to offend Anyone with a comment during the disco.

    • Flux Condenser Vintage Audio Electronics
      Flux Condenser Vintage Audio Electronics  Year ago +3

      Even in English, your comment is confusing. The video is for anyone that doesn’t know how to fix a cassette tape. So yes, it’s for beginners that want to be able to do it the way a pro would. Just as the title says. A pro wouldn’t need the video. What’s your point?

    • Алекс Мавр
      Алекс Мавр Year ago

      @Flux Condenser Vintage Audio Electronics This video is for beginners (dummies, as they say in Russia)

  • Rob Brown
    Rob Brown 6 months ago +1

    Way too much trouble!

  • Rusty Rose McGee
    Rusty Rose McGee Year ago

    GLUE THE TWO HOVS!

  • Rene Neron
    Rene Neron 2 months ago

    Pick me!

  • Salvatore Cento
    Salvatore Cento Year ago

    i strongly advise putting the cassette on a vise first as shown is too dangerous you could seriously damage your fingers.

    • Flux Condenser Vintage Audio Electronics
      Flux Condenser Vintage Audio Electronics  Year ago

      @Salvatore Cento Ha! To each their own! I’d rather take a cut than ruin a tape! But that’s just me. Plus, I’ve been working with Xacto blades regularly for 30+ years so I’m comfortable working with them. You’re correct though, that safety should always be a top priority.

    • Salvatore Cento
      Salvatore Cento Year ago

      i just did it,i replaced the tape in a new cassette,you have to know how to do it and anyway if it happens better the cassette than the fingers right?.at least wear some kind of gloves for protection!.safety first!.

    • Flux Condenser Vintage Audio Electronics
      Flux Condenser Vintage Audio Electronics  Year ago

      I strongly advise you DO NOT put a cassette in a vise. You could seriously damage the cassette.

  • Youvna salian
    Youvna salian 6 months ago +1

    woooooowwwwwwwwww

  • Douglas Greenough
    Douglas Greenough 9 months ago

    📱📲🎵📲📻💛👀✨🛸🎵✨